Wanderlust! The St. Olav’s Way – From Sweden to Norway

Wanderlust! The St. Olav’s Way – From Sweden to Norway


Saint Olav’ Way The Saint Olav’s Way leads from the Swedish
Sundsvall on approximately 600 km to the Norwegian Trondheim. You travel on the acient tracks of Saint Olav. To Sundsvall i travel with a train (from Germany) For an better overview I’ve separated the
trail in different parts. And our/the first part is from Sundsvall to
Stöde. King Olav was chased away from Norway, spend
time abroad, then he came back with a ship and got on land at the Swedish Sundsvall.
(or at Selanger, main harbour at this time) Then he travelled to Norway to get his power
back. Travellers arriving in Sundsvall by train
can follow the route-signs for ten kilometers. From Sundsvall station to Selanger. The official start of the Saint Olav trail
is in Selanger, since at the time there was the main-harbour. In Selanger you can also get your pilgrim-passport
to collect stamps along the way. After a few kilometers you reach Matfors where
you can refill your supplies. Atferwards we go a very long gravelroad towards
the town of Stöde. We already see the church from a distance. A tent can be placed almost anywhere along
the trail through the Scandinavian right of everyone. In addition, idyllic resting places invite
you to spend the night. Everywhere along the way are such small mailboxes
or boxes. There are stamps with which you can collect
stamps for your pilgrim-pass, so you also have a nice memory at home. On long walks through the wilderness there
are small huts with a fireplace, to stay the night. Also in the summer it can be cold at night,
so it’s recommended, to have long underwear. For those of you who prefer it, there are
several pilgrim/hostels with single an multible bedrooms along the way. A list of all places can be found on the official
website. You can find a link to this in the description
of the video. The church in Brunflo was rebuild in the 17’th
centurie and is dedicated to Saint Olav. The tower right next to it serverd as an accommodation. The route now leads along the Storsjön, the
fifth largest lake in Sweden. Arrived in Östersund, the path leads us to
the Stora Kyrkan, translated, “the big church”. The church is definitely worth a visit and
not just something for religious people. If you like you can spend a day in the city
or go straight to the harbour and then to the island of Frösön. Directly on and after the island we find secluded
beaches which invite to overnight. But because the lake is so big, the water
is also very cold in the summer. After leaving behind the island of Frösön
you will be in landscapes with a great view. We continue towards Mörsil. You can travel along the Saint Olav’s Way
on foot and by bicycle, but also with a horse. It’s at the end of August and not only the
cereals are ripe but also the berries along the way. We continue to Duved the last smaller town
near the border. Next to a small pilgrim stamp there is also
sometimes a guestbook where you can write your name, if you like. Near bathing lakes you often find changing
rooms which are also very well suited for drying clothes. The Åre region around Duved is a popular
wintersports region. In winter there are eleven ski-lifts, twentyseven
ski-runs and numerous routes. The neo-gothic church build in 1894 is definitely
worth a visit. In Duved you buy food for three to four days,
for the longest leg to Norway, depending on personal fitness. On the way you can make a detour to the Tännforsen,
one of the most powerful waterfalls in Sweden. The next one to two days, the road consists
exclusively of gravel-roads which are very dusty in dry weather due the cars. For this however nature and the farsightedness
compensate. You can stay at the Skalstugan hotel near
the border. Afterwards the road and the hiking trail separate
and we continue on the Gamla vägen to Norway for the last kilometers. With some luck you can even find reindeer
along the way. Both male and female reindeers wear an antler. Male lose it in autumn, female later in the
spring. If you want to explore the area a bit more
you can also make holidays in the previously mentioned Skalstugan hotel, and go hiking
in the summer or skiing in the winter time. Already after the border we now notice clearly
that we are in Norway. The path becomes steeper, there are more mountains
and we often get sweating. Next we reach the small town Vuku. Here you can fill up your supplies and who
likes can stay at a campsite. Or at a newly opened hostel with 40 beds. The path continues in the direction of Stiklestat,
here King Olav was killed in the year 1030 during a great battle. His body was taken to Trondheim, where he
was later canonized. In Stiklestat there daily guided tours which
bring you closer to the history of Saint Olav. In addition to the chapel of Saint Olav there
are also various actions and exhibitions. During the summer months also various events. After Stiklestat, we head towards Munkby. Here the Olav’s Way separates into the “Indre
Led” the inner and the “Ytre Led” the outer trail. Both trails lead to Trondheim. If we follow the Ytre Led, the outer trail,
we will come to the small town of Levanger. Then we continue through small villages to
Frosta and then to the island Tautra from where we take the ferry to Trondheim. Please note, the ferry departs every few days
and only until the end of August The Indre Led is about 2 days longer, leads
us through forests and untouched nature. After a month’s walk we continue through the
suburbs of Trondheim and reach the Nidaros Cathedral in Trondheim after about 600 kilometers. Right next to Nidaros Cathedral there are
two museums that tell us more about the history. Since Trondheim has much more to offer besides
museums and churches, it is best to spend several days there. For those of you who want to go further, the
Olavs trail on the Norwegian side connecting Oslo and Trondheim, can be the next one.

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