PBS Hawaii – HIKI NŌ Episode 511 | Hosted by Saint Francis School | Full Program

PBS Hawaii – HIKI NŌ Episode 511 | Hosted by Saint Francis School | Full Program


HIKI NŌ 511 Next on HIKI NŌ, stories from across the
island chain. The only down side is, it’s become an addiction. The longest I’ve played was five hours. Why is kendama so addicting? Plus, a science teacher uses the Ironman Triathlon
to measure her limits. Also, never judge a substitute teacher by
his cover. And you’ll meet another teacher who proves
that first impressions don’t always tell the whole story. Learn how to make a rubber band bracelet. How art changed a teacher’s life. And how the values of the 442nd Regiment are
being adopted by our future leaders. All on this episode of HIKI NŌ, coming to
you from Saint Francis School on Oahu, home of The
Saints. That’s next, on the nation’s first statewide
student news network, HIKI NŌ … Can do! Welcome to Saint Francis School, located in
Manoa Valley in Honolulu, on the Island of Oahu.
Our patron, Saint Francis, was not always a saint as the title implies. Before becoming
a devout Christian, he was the spoiled son of a wealthy
family. It was only after being a prisoner of war that
Francis’ eyes and heart were opened by God during what became the lowest points of his
life. With God’s grace and help, Francis became
the clerical saint he’s known as today. [SINGING] Our first story takes us to Central Oahu,
where students from Waipahu High School ask the
question: Why is Kendama so popular? [INDISTINCT CHATTER] Kendama, a Japanese wooden toy meaning sword
ball. It contains a spike and three different cup
sizes. It appears to be a toy craze in Hawaii, and is quite prevalent on campuses across
the State. Let’s find out what makes the kendama so popular. I think kendamas are so popular because it’s
not really a game or toy that you can master. So, like,
once you learn the basics, you can just keep going and start to learn more top-of-the-line
tricks. I think kendama is popular because a lot of
people play it, and it’s been passed down from
everyone. Like, Oh, try this toy, it’s pretty cool. And that’s how I got hooked onto kendama,
too. Kendamas are popular because it’s fun, and
it’s a good toy to make new friends with. It’s physical, and it’s not just on a screen,
and it gets them moving, and the fact that I guess it
challenges them in a way. It’s interactive because it helps with my
motor skills and hand-eye coordination skills. I honestly think it’s better than seeing kids
messing with their phone all the time. I think it’s very
positive. The only down side is, it’s become an addiction to the level where they’re playing
it during class. So, I think it’s fine, as long
as they don’t play it when they’re not supposed to. I play kendama continuously from four hours. The longest I’ve played was five hours. M-hm, it’s addictive. [CHUCKLE] I don’t think kendama should be played in
class at all, because school is a lot more important than
kendama. Oh, my god! Because the popularity of the kendama continues
to grow each day, it seems as if the trend will stay
for a while. This is John De’Orio for Waipahu High School,
reporting for HIKI NŌ. We’re back at Saint Francis School, home base
for this episode of HIKI NŌ. This statue of Mother
Marianne, now Saint Marianne, was placed here shortly before her canonization in October
of 2012. After receiving a plea from King Kalakaua
himself in 1883, Saint Marianne, along with six
other nuns, arrived in Kalaupapa, Molokai, to aid in treating Hansen’s Disease. Saint
Marianne took care of each one with her own two hands. Miraculously,
she, nor any of the sisters, ever contracted the disease. In addition to Saint Marianne, we also have
a statue for Brother Joseph Dutton. Although he never
took religious vows, Dutton was known as Brother Joseph, a brother to everyone. Born in
Vermont, Ira Barnes Dutton enlisted in the 13th Wisconsin Infantry Regiment. This statue
was recently transferred and installed from its
home on Molokai. Like Saint Marianne, Brother Joseph
Dutton felt the call to help those in need. Our next story comes to us from Island School
on Kauai, where we meet a science teacher who
entered the Ironman Triathlon to find out what she’s made of. [MUSIC] Former UCLA soccer captain and current
Island School science teacher Mary Castelanelli shares how goal-setting has allowed her to
successfully balance and manage her time between teaching and training for the 2013 Kona Ironman. I remember watching it at nine years old,
and I’m watching it on TV, and I’m like, these guys just
did what? And they’re on like, Mile 20 in the run. I’m sorry, what? They are truly iron.
All I could think was that they’re made of iron.
Yup, they’re made of iron, ’cause nobody can actually
do that unless they’re made of iron. [CHUCKLE] Training for the Ironman and teaching is really
challenging, of course. But I enjoy setting goals,
and I enjoy being challenged. And I’ve always kind of filled my plate probably a little
bit too full, but that’s how I’ve kind of always operated,
and it keeps me very focused with what I’m doing …
to be working towards, which I really enjoy. And I want to be challenged. I’m really interested
in limits and finding my own limits, and trying
to determine what they are. And so, with the Ironman,
it’s really been a true test of what my limits are as far as physical limits and even, you
know, emotional limits as well. Because it does
take an emotional toll on you. [MUSIC] People always ask me why I do these events.
‘Cause I think morally, I’m actually against Ironman.
It doesn’t even make sense when you think about it. Who wants to go and do that for
eleven hours, and you pay to do it. But to me, I think goal-setting
is so important and having something to focus on. For me, it gives me my drive. And you
know, that translates to other areas of my life, so I’ve
always been working towards a goal. So, if I don’t have something I’m working towards,
then it’s really hard for me. [MUSIC] I wouldn’t recommend an Ironman. Everyone
has their own interests, passions, their own ideas of
what’s challenging for them. I wouldn’t say I’d recommend it. I just think you should
find something that you’re passionate about, find
something that’s gonna challenge you, set goals, and
then take the necessary steps to reach those goals. This is Chan Hsu from Island School on Kauai,
for HIKI NŌ. If you would like to comment on this story,
or anything you see on HIKI NŌ, join the discussion at
Facebook.com/hikinocan do, or send us a Tweet at Twitter.com/hikinocando. We’re back at Saint Francis School, where
we have a diverse student body catering to students from
South Korea, Japan, China, and more. International students come to our school to learn English
while assimilating to American culture. Meeting students from other cultures exposes us to
the larger world beyond our islands, and teaches
us acceptance and patience with different people of
all races. We take you now to the Valley Isle, where
students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle show
that there can be a lot more to a substitute teacher than meets the eye. I’ll teach everything from art to science,
math, and Hawaiian studies, whatever, everything. Even
PE. Some students look at substitute teachers
as people who don’t have much talent or are not as smart
as their regular teachers. I think people think substitute teachers aren’t
that smart, because they like, never experience what
happens in the classroom, and if they were smart, they would be teachers. However, Dr. Gary Greenberg proved that when
it comes to substitute teachers, there is more than
what meets the eye. I’ve written books. I’m on my fifth book right
now. My first book was on sand through the microscope. Not only is he a published author and scientist,
but a college professor and inventor of a special
microscope as well. I’m at the University of Hawaii Institute
for Astronomy, and I’m looking at moon sand; sand that
was retrieved from the moon forty years ago in the Apollo missions. And I’m using my 3-D
microscopes to look at sand in 3-D and characterize what the grains are made of, and what they
look like in 3-D and how they were formed. With his books, inventions, and his university
responsibilities, one might wonder why he chooses to
substitute teach at a middle school. When I first came here and got the opportunity
to teach at Kamehameha Schools, I realized that this
was a really great way for me to fit in a little bit with the Hawaiian community. Being
a teacher at Kamehameha Schools, an all-Hawaiian school,
has enriched my life in ways that never, ever could
have happened had I not been teaching at Kamehameha Schools. Though teaching is something he is passionate
about, there are times where students can be
difficult. We’ve all been to school. You know, I was
a youngster once. When you have substitutes, sometimes you take advantage of them; tell
them things that aren’t exactly true, and, you know, sort
of don’t behave in class. And I think it’s through mutual respect that you keep a good
relationship with kids. I think it’s very fortunate for us, because
although he could choose any school across probably the
whole nation, he still comes back here and teaches us. There is an old saying that goes: Never judge
a book by its cover. Everyone can learn a new thing
from a substitute teacher. Students just have to give him a chance. This is Jaelynn Nobriga for Kamehameha Schools Maui, for HIKI NŌ. Now, another story about how students can
have misperceptions about their teachers. This report
from Ewa Makai Middle School on Oahu first aired in February of 2013. Yes, I was definitely scared of him ever since
I got my schedule. [CHUCKLE] Yeah. Through the stories the eighth-graders told
me, yeah, I was really intimidated by him. I think Mr. Wong is strict. I’ve heard he’s mean, and I’ve walked in the
hallway and I’ve seen him, and he yells, loud. Mr. David Wong, science teacher at Ewa Makai
Middle School, has a reputation for being the
school’s most frightening teacher on campus. Intimidating as Mr. Wong is, he has a different
way of teaching his students that he has developed
over his twenty-one years of being a teacher. Although he may seem frightening, he carries
the best intentions for his students. It’s not important that my students like me.
My number one job is to build relationships with my
students, but that the relationship itself will help them to be prepared for the next
few years, and maybe more years after that. [INDISTINCT CHATTER] I’m strict, and I have a high expectation
of my students to be good communicators, communicate with me, communicate with each other, learning
how to formulate those questions, formulate those
answers. And I do that because it’s really the thinking process. And if we can get students
to practice asking good questions, we have evidence
that they’re being complex thinkers. And with those complex higher order questions, they
can pursue higher answers and more discovery for
themselves. All right, use two hands. You have two hands,
use two hands. For me, the most surprising thing is, when
students don’t expect something, and they discover
without having expected it. That’s surprise. I want my students to become, first of all,
kind people. I want them to be generous, I want them to
be thankful, I want them to be community contributors as good citizens in this country, to give
back of their talents and their skills. I want
them to experience success and excellence in their lives. I
want them to have strong, healthy families. Yes, I do believe Mr. Wong is preparing me
for high school, because he’s showing me how in the
world beyond, you know, if you don’t have a plan, you don’t get in. If you don’t have
any good purpose, you’re not going, they don’t care. Mr. Wong is a great teacher, to be honest. I definitely believe he’s preparing me for
high school. Although Mr. Wong carries the reputation of
The Hammer, which stems from his authoritative personality, this makes students look at him
with a different kind of respect. It gives them the
experiences they need to be successful in high school and beyond. His real world teaching
methods give students a level of responsibility and pushes them to become better people. I hope that my students will continue to be
appreciative, and usually it’s after the fact. They’re not
usually appreciative while they’re with me, but they usually come back and say: Thanks,
I didn’t realize it, but you really prepared me for
high school, or you prepared me for college. You
prepared me to think better, ask better questions. You taught me how to get along with people
and to value relationships. And I would hope that
they would be appreciative of that. Although Mr. Wong can be frightening at first,
he only hopes that his students can appreciate everything he has taught them about life.
This is Madelyn Rodriguez with Ewa Makai Middle School, for HIKI NŌ. We’re here once again at Saint Francis School
in green Manoa Valley, in the beautiful Senior Courtyard. Saint Francis began a new era,
graduating the first co-ed Class of 2013 this past May.
But it was actually the Class of 2002 who had the privilege of making history with the
first and only male graduate. MacKenzie Metcalfe transferred
from Saint Francis School on Kauai that closed down due to low enrollment as a result
of the declining economy. Former classmate Annie
Llamedo remembers him as a quiet young man. He was very respectful and followed the traditions
of an all-girls campus. Now, from the west side of Kauai, students
from Waimea Canyon Middle School show us how to
make a fashion-forward accessory made of rubber bands. Do you want to make a fishtail rubber band
bracelet? Well, we are going to teach you how. First, gather your materials. You will need
small rubber bands of any color, S-shaped clips, and
something with two prongs that are stiff. Please be careful not to hurt yourself on
the pointed tips of the prongs. Start your bracelet by getting your first
color, and put it on the two prongs in an infinity sign shape. Get your next color, and put it on the same
prongs above the infinity-shaped rubber band. Get your third color, and put it on top of
those two, on the same prongs. One side at a time, bring both sides of the
infinity sign up and over the prongs, making sure the
other two rubber bands stay on. Put your next color on above the other rubber
bands, on the same prongs. Bring the bottom-most rubber band up and over
the prongs, one side at a time, making sure the
others do not come off. Continue this process until your bracelet
reaches its desired length. When you do reach your
desired length, pull on the bracelet to tighten it. Make sure it fits your wrist by wrapping
the bracelet around your wrist. To end your bracelet, don’t add any more rubber
bands. Just bring up the last two on the prongs. Pull off the rubber band bracelet, making
sure to keep its ends closed. Add an S-shaped clip to
attach it. Put two sides of the last rubber band in on one end, then attach the other
side. Now, you are finished making your fishtail
bracelet. Remember, you can play around with the
colors to make any style you like. Have fun! We’re back in Manoa at Saint Francis, where
behind me stands our brand new Clarence T.C. Ching
Athletic and Music Complex. This facility has been a long time coming not only for students,
but for alumni as well. While Saint Francis School
has always had a welcoming atmosphere, faculty, staff, students, and alumni all have a new
gathering place to come home to. [SINGING] Our next story comes from Kihei, Maui, where
students at Lokelani Intermediate School show us
how a teacher’s illness led to the discovery of her passion: art. [MUSIC] I work as an eighth grade science teacher
here at Lokelani Intermediate School, and have recently
picked up on teaching an art class also. It’s my hobby. Well, it’s not for the money. It’s actually
more about the fun moments that we have in class. It’s
those moments when people connect, or the aha moment when someone really learns something
and they finally get it. Those are all the fun times. Several years ago, I got very sick and was
in and out of the hospital a lot. And recuperating with a
how-to-draw cartoon book, it caught me like a bug, like a disease. And actually, that
was the silver lining for getting sick. It was learning how
to draw. Because before that, I couldn’t draw stick
people, and I wouldn’t even try. You know, I think that’s the most exciting
part about drawing, is the feeling that I can get into.
Then, when I get to drawing, I can completely lose track of everything. It totally overwhelms
me. I love doing portraits, so just when I look
in people’s eyes and I see who they are by looking in their
eyes, I love it when I can capture the person’s soul. It’s fun. It’s challenging. It’s like
a puzzle to me to see if I can nail it. I am learning
art by reading books and listening to tapes, and going online.
And so, I’m just learning by myself. Like anything you learn brand new, it’s frustrating,
and especially if it’s a high technical skill
you’re learning. I can’t tell you how many trash dumpsters
I must have filled with the mistakes. And through all
that frustration, you persevere through that frustration, you can develop the skill. I
think the art skill is latent in a lot of people. There’s
a skill there that a lot of people could wake up. [MUSIC] Art not only brought life back to Miss James,
but helped her share her passion and creativity. I am
Megan King reporting from Lokelani Intermediate School, for HIKI NŌ. Welcome back to Saint Francis School. After
the construction of the gym, the old basketball court
was moved to the upper courtyard, which is now called the Souza Courtyard, dedicated
to our head of school, Sister Joan of Arc Souza’s parents,
who supported the school in every aspect possible. Encouraging physical activity, students use
this courtyard to play basketball, volleyball, and other
fun things during their breaks. Our final story comes to us from the Makiki
District of Oahu, where students at Roosevelt High
School learn of the values developed by the famed 442nd Regimental Combat Team. Over seventy years ago, after the attack on
Pearl Harbor, the Japanese Americans confronted an
untrusting nation. In 1943, the 442nd’s 100th Battalion Regimental Combat Team, the first
ever all- Japanese American military unit, was formed.
Ted Tsukiyama, one of the few remaining Nisei veterans from the 442nd, shares his experience
of the price of equality. There was a price to pay. You know, blood
was shed, lives were lost, and all because the
motivation is, we’ve got to prove our loyalty. Through his service in the military, Mr. Tsukiyama
envisioned a country where all races come together. The lesson is that, well, you know, you’ve
heard the phrase: Americanism is not a matter of race,
color, or ancestry. Americanism is a matter of the mind, the heart, and the spirit. The hard work and success of the 442nd made
it possible for more Japanese Americans to advance
in the U.S. society. General Shinseki, you know, he became the
first Japanese American to be Army Chief of Staff, the
number one position in the U.S. Army. He always says: You know, I got here, I’m standing on
the shoulders of those Nisei soldiers. So, he
knows that somebody else sacrificed, somebody else
worked hard. To this day, the work and the values of the
442nd still live in the hearts and the minds of the
American people. [APPLAUSE/INDISTINCT CHATTER] Major Kimura of Roosevelt High School is a
senior instructor of the JROTC program and a firm
supporter of the values of the 442nd. That working together and that focus, and
that discipline drove them to accomplish a lot of things
that other units that didn’t have that type of adversity, to bind them together. It’s
just fantastic what they were able to accomplish in that very
intense situation and time period of our history. Major Kimura uses the values and lessons of
the 442nd to teach his cadets the importance of
cooperation. Bringing to the ROTC is team building, team
bonding, working as a team. One person is not more
important than the other. It’s the whole team concept, and of course, the indoctrination.
And I guess Douglas MacArthur said it the best way:
Duty, honor, country. And we quote it here: duty,
honor, country, and Roosevelt. And the last thing I want to emphasize is that each one
of us has strong points, and sometimes we need some
help in some areas. But if we’re working together, that’s the ideal situation. That’s what we
want to do with our program here at Roosevelt. From a soldier with a cause to an Army instructor,
to the future leaders of our nation, the legacy of
the 442nd lives on. This is Abigail Olipani from Roosevelt High School, reporting for
HIKI NŌ. [SHOUTING IN UNISON] We’re back in Manoa Valley, where you’ll find
many students and teachers from our Saint Francis
family. When the students of Saint Francis School are craving something other than cafeteria
food, they head down to Manoa Marketplace for a
bite to eat. The students here support local businesses
such as Waipuna Sushi, Andy’s Sandwich Shop, and everyone’s favorite crackseed store, Kay’s
Crackseed. Chu-Ching Yang of the Class of 2014 runs this store along with her mother
and grandmother. Well, we have come to the end of this episode
of HIKI NŌ. Remember, all of these stories were
written, shot, and edited by students like us. We hope you’ve enjoyed watching them as much
as we’ve enjoyed sharing them with you. Make sure to tune in to next week’s episode
for more proof that Hawaii students HIKI NŌ Can do!

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