PBS Hawaii – HIKI NŌ Episode 202 | Hosted by Saint Francis School | Full Program

PBS Hawaii – HIKI NŌ Episode 202 | Hosted by Saint Francis School | Full Program


HIKI NŌ 202 Aloha. I’m Kelsea Gines I’m Cierra Nascimento … I’m Peyton Coronas… I’m Rachel Carlos … I’m Kalei Mau … And I’m Kesley Phillips. We’re coming to you
today from the beautiful Manoa campus of Saint Francis School on Oahu, the home base for
this episode of HIKI NŌ, the nation’s first statewide
student news network. HIKI NŌ means Can Do, and on this episode,
you will see what schools in Hawaii can do with a
camera, computer editing software, and a lot of hard work. Schools from around the State have worked
together to create today’s show. From Oahu, we have stories from Waialua High
School, Kalani High School, and Kapolei High School. From Maui, we have stories from Hana K through
12 School and Lokelani Intermediate. From the Big Island of Hawaii, Kea’au High
School. And from Kauai, a story from Chiefess Kamakahelei
Middle School. On this show, you’ll hear diverse voices from
across the island chain … Telling stories that connect us all … On HIKI NŌ. Before we start our first story, we would
like to recognize the grant organizations who made
HIKI NŌ a reality. They believed that Hawaii could create the
nation’s first statewide student news network. They put their faith in us and said, Can Do;
and for this, we say mahalo. Now, on with the show! Saint Francis Convent School, which is now
called Saint Francis School, opened in 1924 in
Liliha, and moved to its current location in Manoa in 1931. Saint Francis has always
been an all- girls school until its decision to accept
boys in 2006. This was not a popular decision for
everyone. The atmosphere on campus is very different with the addition of the boys, but
most of the girls have adapted. There are times, though,
that we wish we had our all-girls environment back. This year’s graduating class will be
the last class of all girls at Saint Francis. Residents on the North Shore of Oahu are also
dealing with some rifts in their community. Coming from the island of Oahu, Waialua High
School brings us this story. For the past decade, shark tours in Haleiwa
Boat Harbor have created conflict within the North
Shore community. People in the community have very strong opinions about this persistent
problem. We interviewed a concerned fisherman about this issue. He asked to remain
anonymous to avoid negative reactions from other community members. I’m a longtime fisherman here. My grandfather,
my father, my uncles, my brothers, we all fish
out of Waialua Harbor, Haleiwa Harbor. For generations, crabbers have been harvesting
crabs off shore from Haleiwa Boat Harbor. Friends of mine started crabbing white trap
back in the early 80s. That brought the sharks, that
kinda trained the sharks, the fishermen did. They put bait in the traps for two days, and
pull the traps back up. Once they get it to the top,
they take the old bait out, throw it in the water, so the
sharks would follow the crab boats around. The attraction of the sharks to the crabbers’
bait is what spawned the shark tour industry. It is
the shark tour industry in Haleiwa Boat Harbor that is the catalyst for the conflict of the
community. When you talk about this shark tour, you going
get plenty mixed feelings, because plenty guys,
they like, plenty guys not going like ’em. The organization called Safe Waters for Hawaii
organized community members to protest the use
of chumming in the shark tour industry at Haleiwa Boat Harbor in 2010. It was, like, pretty silly. You know, they’re
saying that we’re bringing sharks into shore and
everything. That is so B.S. That’s just not true, and it’s proven by science. Despite the fact that shark tours no longer
chum the waters, conflict and harsh feelings in the
community still exist. These harsh feelings have simmered and boiled up to the point where
citizens have crossed over the line of lawfulness. Within the span of a three-month period, three
of the North Shore Shark Adventures tour boats moored in Haleiwa Boat Harbor have been set
afire by arsonists. These fires have resulted in over $450,000 in damage to the shark tour
operators’ boats. As far as reaction, it’s pretty scary, you
know. It’s domestic terrorism at its best. The Federal
law and the State laws say that no feeding of sharks in Federal or State waters unless
you’re doing research. Which we are doing. We stopped
feeding the sharks just to show people we can
do without it. But we’ll sure be glad when this is all over, ’cause we want to start
feeding the sharks again, because it makes it really a
much enjoyable tour. Although the shark tour industry has discontinued
the practice of chumming in shark tours since 2010, there is still a lingering fear of shark
attacks for some of those who enjoy North Shore
ocean activities. Reporting for HIKI NŌ from Waialua High and
Intermediate School … I’m Alyza Malunao… And I’m Cyerra Foster. If you would like to comment on this story,
or anything you see on HIKI NŌ, join the discussion
at facebook.com/hikinocando, or send us a Tweet at twitter.com/hikinocando. Aloha Show is a tradition that we have had
here at Saint Francis School for forty years. It is just
like May Day, but happens during Aloha Week in September. This year, we dedicated our
show to Emma Chang, who passed away this past December.
She would have been a senior this year. Hula was her passion, and dedicating the Aloha
Show to her was the best way we could honor her and show what a big impact she made in
all of our lives. Our next story takes us to the Big Island
of Hawaii, where student Maka’ala Lum Ho has also
made a lasting impact on the students and teachers at Kea’au High School. The campus of Kea’au High School, which is
located nine miles from Hilo town, a beautiful campus where students value friendship, and
carry themselves with pride. Prior to the start of
the 2011 school year, tragedy struck, and a beloved son named Maka’ala Lum Ho left us
all too soon in a kayak accident in the waters off
of Kapoho. It’s pretty amazing how much people he touched
in sixteen years of his life, how much people showed up to the funeral, how much people
was there for support him and his family. My best memory with Maka was the weight room,
definitely. He was always the first one there, and he was probably, like, not the strongest
one in the weight room, but he always worked the
hardest, and he always, like, motivated us to work hard and not slack. Many students gave tribute to Maka’ala in
their own ways. Saidee Ahuna plays a song she
composed for Maka. [SINGING] He could always make everybody happy. [SINGING CONTINUES] Senior Kylin Josue memorializes Maka in a
portrait she created in art class. [INDISTINCT CONVERSATION] A race called The Maka Mile was recently held
to honor the memory of Maka. … Maka’ala’s dad. We’re at the 2011 Maka’ala
Mile, fundraiser for the cross country team and
a way for us to reflect on Maka’ala’s life. He was a student here at Kea’au High School,
and just an all-around great person. So as you can
see, everybody’s getting ready for the race, and we
hope to have a really good time. Maka’s infectious. I know a lot of people
you’ve heard over this time say that he could bring a
smile upon his face, but it’s a really true thing if you got to know Maka as good as I
did. You know, no matter how tough times were at home,
tough times are at work, tough times are just around in the community, seeing Maka could
bring that smile to your face. Though Maka’s not physically here with us,
definitely, his memory is being carried on because he
was loved so much by everyone. And everyone’s trying to do their best to keep their memories
alive of him. And for that, I think Maka’s probably smiling down on us, ’cause no one’s
forgetting him. Here at Kea’au High, there are no more tears,
for we celebrate the enduring memory of our friend, Maka’ala Lum Ho. This is Rainbow Rice
reporting from Kea’au High School, for HIKI NŌ. If you could create your own perfect world,
what would it look like? Does it include wealth, success, worldly possessions, or is it on
a much more global level, such as the end of war,
pollution, hunger? The students at Saint Francis School are creating their own perfect world
with paint. Coming from the island of Oahu, the students
at Kalani High School are expressing their perfect
world in words. Well, my perfect world would be … if everyone
wouldn’t be fighting, and there will be no problems. In it is where everyone lives happy together,
and … life is rewarding. Like, life shouldn’t be
hard on people, as long as they try hard and work with effort. A perfect world is if there were no such thing
as cultures, and we all lived as one. I kinda want a dream world, like Harry Potter.
‘Cause it seems kinda cool to live in that kind of
world, where you could imagine whatever, and it could actually happen. A perfect world would be, like, where everybody
is accepted for who they are, and nobody passes judgment on anybody. The Senior Courtyard here at Saint Francis
School was built in memory of Auntie Maiki Aiu
Lake, who is recognized as the most important hula teacher of the 20th Century. She attended
Saint Francis School over seventy years ago. Her favorite tree is planted in the courtyard
on which blossoms the beautiful and sweet puakenikeni.
Our principal, Sister Joan of Arc, an alumna of Saint Francis School, treasures
the center pond which was built in 1932 in the Senior
Courtyard. Her father added the canopy in 1993, and it remains today as a legacy for
us to enjoy and treasure. Our next story comes from Lokelani Intermediate
on the island of Maui, where Saint Francis School alumna Stephanie Kamakeeaina, now a
teacher at Lokelani Intermediate, shares a beautiful story of the special meaning of
a legacy that her father left for her, and that she shares
with the students and staff at Lokelani Intermediate. My father was my hero. So this flag was given
to the school in his memory. He was the most patriotic person that I ever knew, and the
fact that he served in three wars. He served in World
War II, in Korea, and Vietnam. And, I mean, even ’til today, he’s gone eleven years, but
he’s still my hero. He always gave his all. He
always taught us to give our all. But he also taught us
how to love our country, and how to be proud of our country. And he made us proud. And
this is one way of keeping him close to me … to
make sure that every day, he is still a part of me.
And so, that way, with the flag flying up there, it will always remind me, Dad’s watching,
Dad’s watching. Long ago, here in the lush green Manoa Valley,
the Manoa Stream flowed from mauka to makai, from the mountain to the sea. Its direct route
to the sea has been diverted over the years by the
expanding Manoa community. This stream, which borders our Saint Francis School campus, at
times has caused flooding, not here in Saint Francis, but in lower-lying areas of the community. Next, Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on
the beautiful island of Kauai brings us a story
about the changes happening at Kekaha Beach. Beaches; they aren’t only blue skies and glistening
waters. They’re also filled with memories, whether imprinted in the shore, or built in
a mighty sandcastle. But what if all of that was slowly
vanishing? You see, there’s no beach without sand, and that’s exactly what will happen
at Kekaha Beach if the sand continues to disappear. The erosion there at Kekaha, I believe, yeah,
it’s affecting that whole section. It’s just not one
place. And recently, more sand has gone out of there than five years, ten years. We’re
talking miles now of sand that’s depleted really rapidly
when they put the small boat harbor. But as the
sand depleted along the highway, State Highways put in rock walls along the road there. That
probably has a lot to do with the erosion of the sand here. Sand is, you know, part
of our living here, and it helps to make beaches so that
people can swim in safety. And sand at the beach is
still there, but it’s offshore. Hopefully, nature will take its course and bring it back. The erosion didn’t only take sand out from
Kekaha Beach, but it also affected the County and
the people of Kauai. I’m born and raised on the west side of Kauai,
Kekaha. I felt really depressed, just knowing that
the beach wasn’t the same as how I used to know it. I noticed the beach disappearing,
let’s say, about eight months ago. I was driving to work,
not noticing anything wrong, until the waves breaking against the rocks, and the water
start coming over on the highway. Been surfing here for the last twenty years.
As far as the erosion goes, I guess you just can’t stop
the erosion. It’ll happen. Hopefully, it’ll come back, though, the beach. Well, when the Kekaha Beach was eroded, they
lost a lot of sand. It affected the County mainly
because we had to move the lifeguard’s stand. So we have begun to look for locations we
could move the chair to. Kauai’s economy is largely
driven by tourism. It affects our economy, because fewer tourists are able to use that
beach. So what we’re doing is, we’re looking at how
we can restore that beach to its original condition. As far as all the sand coming back, no. Probably
one of the ways of solutions is to remove all the
stuff, and see what Mother Nature does. We need to keep it as best we can, because the
end result is, we’re gonna have a junk place.
And if you went to Kekaha recently, you’ll see what I
mean. As time continues to pass, so does the remainder
of sand on Kekaha Beach. The erosion on Kekaha Beach is only an example of what’s
to come to other land areas around the island. It will
affect more than just losing land, but also the well being of Kauai, and its people. So
what will be the fate of this vanishing beach? For now,
those decisions lie in the hands of the government and Mother Nature. For HIKI NŌ, this has
been Kasey Emoto reporting at Kekaha Beach. If you would like to comment on this story,
or anything you see on HIKI NŌ, join the discussion
at facebook.com/hikinocando, or send us a Tweet at twitter.com/hikinocando. Most Saint Francis students live everywhere
besides Manoa Valley, where our campus is located.
Every day, many of us have long distances to commute to school. Parents and students
are willing to make that sacrifice, because they
value the Christian environment and college prep
education that Saint Francis School provides. For our next story, coming from the island
of Maui, Hana K through 12 School shows us how
one community deals with the isolation of one long road, in and out of their community,
and the sacrifices that they make to maintain that
isolation and to keep Hana, Hana. They travel to the eastern side of Maui … For generations, the people of East Maui have
been traveling the Hana Highway, which follows the curves of Maui’s coastline. The main attractions
are over fifty bridges, numerous waterfalls, dangerous cliffs, and six hundred seventy-seven
turns. In 2000, the Hana Highway became a national monument. Because of the road, the
people of Hana have unique challenges that filter
into their lifestyle. This is our life, this is what we have to
do, we have to travel the roads. If you’re not coming to
Hana or going to the other side for a vacation, like, that’s where everything is, is on the
other side of the island. When you take a trip on the Hana Highway,
you have to prepare for anything. Say, we need to be at a soccer game at ten
o’clock in the morning. Okay; so we have to prepare
the kids. Soccer balls, our cleats, shin guards. [INDISTTINCT SHOUTING] Some of the things we bring to Kahului is
water, a flashlight, extra clothes, and a pillow and a
blanket. Some other things we have to bring is music
and snacks to keep the driver up, jumper cable, reusable shopping bag, and don’t forget your
money. Many residents of Hana believe that the driving
habits of nonresidents can create certain problems for us. It can be really frustrating,
because we’re on tight time schedules, and we need
to get to our destinations on time. These habits that some of the nonresidents have
include, like, driving in the middle of the road, stopping
at inopportune moments, or driving in our lanes,
cutting corners. Every day we travel that road, our lives are
at risk. You never know when a boulder is gonna fall
down on your car. We lost a schoolteacher already, and there were several others, too.
I had a cousin who left Hana early in the morning
to go work, it was pouring rain, the road was slippery,
it was muddy; he just drove off to the side. And they found him the next day in his truck,
gone. I’ve been a big part of getting my parents
off the Hana Road, only because it was taking a toll on
their life. I founded an organization to create the nation’s first communal dialysis home
in Hana. Although the Hana Road is so important to
all of us, to some, it’s torture. Because they’re not
well, they’re sick, and you cannot miss your appointments. That’s why many of them just
give up on life. I think pretty much, it keeps
Hana from overdevelopment because people don’t want
to travel far. It’s very limited on what you can bring in to develop because of our bridges,
and you can only carry so much, and that’s what’s
helping us to keep Hana the way it is. It helps us
to keep our traditions, our culture, the beauty of Hana. And we like it that way. The people of East Maui have learned to adapt
to a lifestyle compatible to the Hana Highway. Their challenges have now become their opportunities.
This is Leimamo Naihe from Hana K – 12 School, signing off for HIKI NŌ. Every morning and afternoon, on the campus
of Saint Francis School, Junior Police Officers wearing their orange vests assist their fellow
elementary students in and out of their vehicles. Safety is their priority. On Tuesday, our
JPOs practice drills with a Honolulu Police Officer.
Last year was the first year of this program at Saint Francis, and we have about twenty-three
fourth-, fifth-, and sixth-grade students participating. In our next story from Kapolei High School,
here on the island of Oahu, we learn why their Junior ROTC Program is one of the newest and
largest programs on campus. [BAND PLAYING] Kapolei High School’s Marine Corps Junior
ROTC is one of the newest and largest programs on
campus, and here’s why. Our program is a leadership education program.
It’s an incentive for students to graduate from
high school, and it prepares them for their role in their community after high school,
whether they pursue secondary education, military, or enter
the job force. The cadets assume leadership roles
in co-curricular activities, so they can design and set up their own training for their cadets
on those teams. And the first sergeant and I
provide the guidance, and the supervision, and the
safety for them to conduct their own training. The program will, I think, offer a lot of
opportunities for a lot of students that wanted ROTC
here for a long period of time, a long time. That’s why the numbers were so big this year.
And for me to be at Kapolei High School, I want
us to be part of the best of the best, and I want us to
have all the opportunities at all the other schools. Well, in Junior ROTC, there’s no usual day.
It’s always different. We always learn something new, there’s always something different to
be taught, there’s always something different to be
trained, you know, from training new cadets to preparing for our drill competitions, color
guard for football games. There’s no such thing
as a regular day for us. I’ve learned to become a better
leader, and to respect my friends and peers more. And I think the best thing I learned
is that leadership, when leading your peers, isn’t
as easy as it looks. It’s actually a lot harder. We do a lot of different training, either
physical-well, mostly physically. But mentally wise, we
do that in the classroom. Physically, we do like, a lot of review of what we already learned,
so that way, we get it engraved in our minds.
I think the thing I like the most about ROTC is the
people themselves. Like, we have like, a whole variety of different types of people, from
the quietest people to the loudest person in the
classroom. I joined ROTC to try something different,
’cause I was so used to, like, a lot of the same stuff, and I wanted to be like, one of
the first people to actually be in this program for
the first year. This is Kayla Kaji from Kapolei High School,
reporting for HIKI NŌ. As the students from Kalani High School have
described their perfect world, do they envision the same perfect world? Do people across the
world share the same vision? Here are more visions for a perfect world from Kalani High
School. My perfect world would be where students have
a choice to learn what they want, and not have
to learn their curriculum, like learn Algebra and all that stuff. Because, really, like
in life, we don’t really need to know that. First thing, no bad smells, just, you know,
nothing bad. No robbers or stealers, or … anything bad, none of that. And then, everybody’s nice,
and we’re all one family. Like, not blood family,
but like, how me and Noah Kim are family. Yup; we’re like brothers. Somewhere, where there’s no crime, or where
everyone is peaceful, everyone likes everybody, everyone wants to be friends with everybody. Well, that’s it for this week’s show. We hope you enjoyed the stories we have shared
with you from around our islands. Join us next week to see what the students
of Hawaii can do. Only on HIKI NŌ, and only on PBS Hawaii. Aloha!

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