Mother Angelcia Live Classics – ALL SAINTS AND HALLOWEEN – Nov. 1, 1994 – EWTN

Mother Angelcia Live Classics – ALL SAINTS AND HALLOWEEN – Nov. 1, 1994 – EWTN


[music] Man: “Mother Angelica Live!” brought to you from the Eternal Word Television Studios in Birmingham, Alabama. [music] Mother: See in you, the love, the compassion of Jesus. The most glorious work of all, to praise God in His Kingdom. Anyone moved by the Spirit… Anyone who lives in love, lives in God and God lives in Him. [music] What a wonderful thing is our Church. This whole network is built on trust. The essence of evangelization is to tell everybody, “Jesus loves you!” We’re all called to be great saints. Don’t miss the opportunity! (applause) Mother Angelica: Well, friends, here we are, and if you wonder what we’re doing, we don’t have the slightest idea. (Mother and audience laugh) These children were out for Halloween and as good Catholics, they had a saintly Halloween vigil, and they all depict a certain saint. And my sisters assured me they would be absolutely phenomenal for tonight’s show. So I’m going to–I’ve been trying to get this angel to give me her horn but she won’t do it. (laughter) You like that one? Oh, well. I’m going to introduce some of them to you because I think it’s a wonderful way to practice Halloween. This is All Saints Feast Day and all of these children depict one particular saint. And they got up there last night. We gave them candy after they said who they were and they described who they were. You better watch you don’t lose your wings, St. Michael! (laughter) Huh? Boy: All you have to do is ask, Mother Angelica. Mother: Oh, you can? Who made your armor? Boy: We got it at a store. (laughter) Mother: Well, you look just like St. Michael. Boy: Because I dressed up like him because I love Jesus. Audience: Awwww. Mother: Because you love Jesus. How do you like that, huh! Is that why… Child: I was in… Mother: Oh, the silent one, huh? (laughter) Girl: I was in October, I was dressed up like a angel of St. Michael. (laughter) Mother: You dressed up like St. Michael in October? Girl: Yeah, on Halloween day, Saints Day. Mother: And you like St. Michael? Yeah? Can you blow that… You know, St. Gabriel blew the horn. Boy: That’s why I’m dressed up like St. Michael. Mother: We’ve got a little competition here, everybody. (laughter) A little competition. What are you doing with this sword? Boy: I just fight off little bitty bad guys. (laughter) Mother: Oh, you take care of little bitty bad guys, yeah? I’ve got some big bad guys–you can have them too. Does that thing come out or is it… Boy: Oh, yeah, it comes out. Mother: Let me see what– ooh, boy! (laughter) How do you like that! Okay, you’re little St. Gabriel, aren’t you? Yeah, can you blow your horn? Huh? Yeah, go on and give it a whack. Can you blow it? Well, we’ll try to blow it at the end of this thing. (laughter) Boy: Guess why I dressed up like St. Michael. Mother: Why did you… Boy: Because I, that little girl loves St. Michael. Mother: Oh, really? Boy: Yep. Mother: Well, we’re going to come back to you, St. Michael, in a minute, before you and Gabriel have a little thing going here. (laughter) Look, I’m going to ask all these other ones who they are. Do you want to know who they are, too? You know who they are? Let’s try it, let’s see who they are. Who are you? Girl 2: I’m Elizabeth Gill and I’m dressed as Mary, the Mother of God. Mother: How wonderful. Are you all home-schooled? Boy: She’s dressed like Mary? Mother: He’s surprised. (laughter) Is that a relative of yours? Girl 1: I’m dressed up like an angel. Mother: Huh? Boy: I am too! Mother: You better sit there. Your wings are gonna get clipped. (laughter and applause) And who are you? Girl 3: I’m Marie Gill and I’m dressed like St. Agnes. Mother: Which St. Agnes is that? Girl 3: the martyr. Mother: The martyr. Some of you look like martyrs right now, you know. Girl 1: I’m dressed up like, like… Mother: Gabriel. Gabriel, there we go. And who are you dressed like? Huh? Who are you dressed like? Somebody say something. (kids giggle) Boy 2: St. Kateri. Mother: Oh, you’re Kateri, huh, the Indian. How wonderful. And how about you? Boy 2: I’m Tomas Gill and I’m dressed as Juan Diego. Mother: Juan Diego! How do you like that. And you’re… (applause) I got you’re– I want the bishop to stand up a minute. Will you stand up? There you go. (applause) Now, I would like a little skit here. I don’t know if this is going to work. Now, you all be real quiet because this is very serious stuff, you know. Okay, now are you going to ask him for something? Here’s this Juan Diego. What are you going to tell him? Loud voice. Huh? What are you going to say to him? Boy 2: I tell him that the Mother of God told me to ask him if… Boy 3: (indistinguishable) Mother: What are you going to answer him when he asks you that the Mother of God says she wants a shrine? What are you going to say? Boy 3: Tell me I need a sign. Mother: That you need a sign. Okay, now he just told you he needs a sign. He’s a bishop. Oh, wow! (applause) And what are you supposed to do when you see the sign? Boy 3: Kneel down. Mother: You’re going to kneel down. Can you do that? Oh, here we go. Now we know. Would you like to bless everybody tonight, bishop? Huh? Go ahead. You just bless everybody. Here we go. There we go! Hey! (applause) And who are you? Girl 4: I’m Heather Wilson and I’m dressed as St. Zita. Mother: Zita! I never heard of St. Zita. Who is she? Girl 4: She was born poor in a domestic family. Mother: Ah, was she a cook? All you who can’t cook, pray to St. Zita. (laughter) And who are you? As if I didn’t know. You look like St. Patrick. Are you St. Patrick? Did St. Patrick have red hair? I thought he had green hair. (kids giggle) She’s laughing! (kids giggle) And what about you now, who do you represent? Boy 4: Me? Mother: Mm-hmm. Boy 4: Dominic Savio. Mother: Dominic Savio. How old was he when he died? Does anybody know? Boy 4: 15. Mother: He was 15? That’s pretty young to be a saint, huh? You know, it shows all of us that these children know who they depict, that they know where they lived and how long it took them to be a saint. And you know, for somebody my age, it’s kind of humiliating. (audience chuckles) But anyway, we do still have time. Do you all know you’re supposed to be saints, huh? You’re supposed to be as holy as the people you depict, huh. Like this little guy here… Girl 1: I’m an angel! Mother: you’re an angel. I would’ve never guessed. Is that why you got a halo? Yeah? Do you wear it all day? You do? Okay. Who is this little fellow here? What is he? Who are you, honey? Boy 5: Me? Mother: Yeah. Boy 5: David. Mother: Who is he? Kids: David. Mother: You’re David. Stand up so we can see your slingshot. Hey, look at that, huh. Can you, can you-have you got some stones? Boy 5: What? (audience laughs) Mother: You’ve got-by golly he’s got some stones. How many you got? I had a few people in mind… Candy? (laughter) What is that? Oh, that’s just a little paper stone, huh. You know, you know how to play with a slingshot? Boy 5: What? Mother: Can you use that slingshot? Huh? Is that your sister? That’s your sister? Does she always tell you what to do? (kids laugh) She doesn’t. And who are you, honey? What’s your crown? Girl 5: I’m St. Elizabeth of Hungary. Mother: Of Hungary. Is that the one that used to give away bread and when her husband objected, she had roses in her basket? Girl 5: Yeah. Mother: Yeah, that’s the one. How about you up there with the staff? Boy 6: St. Christopher. Mother: St. Christopher? Ah, he came back. (audience laughs) And who are you with the Bible in your hand? Boy 7: St. Anthony. Mother: St. Anthony? You mean the one who finds everything that’s lost? Really? How wonderful. And who’s the one behind you? Girl 6: St. Anna, the mother of Mary. Mother: Oh, you’re the mother of Our Lady when she was–how do you like that. That’s wonderful. Now, I am trying to figure out who you are. (kids giggle) Are you a hermit? (kids giggle) Are you a hermit? Boy 8: No. Mother: Who are thee? He’s who? Kids: She’s Mary. Mother: I know, but is that Joseph? Boy 8: Joachim. Mother: Oh, you’re–oh, I see that. That’s why you’ve got grey hair. Huh, because you’re Joachim. How about this one on the bottom. Who are you? Girl 7: Me? Mother: Yeah. Girl 7: Elizabeth Ann Seton. Mother: You’re Elizabeth Seton. Well, how do you like that. Do you know anything about Elizabeth Seton? Girl 7: I know a lot about her. Mother: You do! What about her? Girl 7: she started a girls’ school and she started Sisters of Charity. And they’re in St. Vincent’s Hospital now. Mother: Oh, wonderful. And who are you? Child: St. Nicholas. Mother: Huh? Child: He’s St. Nicholas. Mother: Oh! Will you stand up, sweetheart? Yeah, who are you? Boy 9: I’m St. Nicholas. Mother: Who is he? Kids: St. Nicholas. Mother: Oh, really. I should know. You’ve got a bishop’s hat on. Do you have a cross to bless everybody with, too? No? You don’t look like a big sinner to me. Boy 9: I don’t have a cross. Mother: Ah, let’s turn around, see if everybody can see St. Nick, huh. Did your mother make your uniform? She did? Did you have fun last night? You did? Now let’s see, did I… Who are you? Girl 8: I’m St. Joan of Arc. Mother: Joan of Arc. You know, the sisters picked three saints out of a little jar today. You know, we picked Joan of Arc. We said we need a particular saint for our chapel and so we picked Joan of Arc for our chapel. And who are–we know who you are, don’t we. Who did we miss? Okay, we’ll start back here. Who are you with the staff in your hand? Boy 10: Moses. Mother: You’re Moses. Cool! Get up and let me see you. How do you like that. Ah, he looks like a shepherd. Do you know a lot about Moses? Nope? I guess not too many people know much about Moses. He was the one that gave us the Law. And he was the one that talked to God and didn’t die. He saw God face to face. And who are you? Hmm? Boy 11: St. John Bosco. Mother: You’re Don Bosco. How do you like that. So we got Don Bosco here and Dominic Savio there. Let’s see this little one. Who are you, sweetheart? Huh? Who are you? Boy 12: George. Mother: Who? Boy 12: St. George. I’m St. George. St. George. Mother: Oh, how lovely. And how about you? Boy 13: St. Tarcisius. Mother: You’ve got the best–show the people the host. Did you know that Tarcisius was a martyr? Boy 13: Yes. Mother: And that he died defending the Blessed Sacrament? Do you know how old he was? Boy 13: 12 years old. Mother: Hey, look at that, huh. These are pretty smart kids. At 12 years old and he died a martyr’s death. And who are you, sweetheart? Girl 9: I’m St. Dymphna. Mother: Dymphna? She’s the one that’s for people who have nervous problems, huh. You don’t look like you’ve got one nervous problem. (kids giggle) You think that’s funny? You’re my best fan. I’m waiting for you to blow that horn. (laughter) Now, who are you? Yeah. Girl 10: I’m St. Cecilia. Mother: Stand up and let’s see what St. Cecilia looks like. Ah! There we go. Can you play that? You can? (harp strums) I tell ya–St. Cecilia. And here’s David, and who are you? Girl 11: St. Joan of Arc. Mother: Oh, we’ve got another Joan of Arc, huh. You want to stand up and let me see you. Ah, you look like Joan of Arc. Do you know anything about Joan of Arc? Girl 11: Yes, she was born in France and when she was 16 St. Michael the Archangel appeared to her and told her to help France overcome the British. And she became a soldier and she freed many French cities. But the British captured her and she was burned at the stake. (applause) Mother: I bet a lot of those people didn’t know that, huh. You and your sister are the ones that say the Hail Mary nice and loud on holy hours, huh. Is that what you do? Girl 1: I know how to say the Hail Mary. Mother: You know how to say the Hail Mary? You want to say it? Go ahead. Girl 1: “Hail Mary, full of grace…” Mother: Nice and loud. Okay. Girl 1: “…full of grace, the Lord is with you. “Blessed art Thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of Thy womb, Jesus. “Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners now and at the hour of our death. Amen.” Mother: Oh, hey. (applause) I think St. Michael got docked over here. Now, who did I miss? Did I miss somebody? Did I miss you? Come on, sweetheart. Who are you? Come on. Girl 12: Our Lady of Hope. Mother: Our Lady of Hope? Can you stand up, and let’s see your garment? Ah, yes. That’s wonderful. Here comes Michael, everybody. You better watch out. (kids giggle) He’s going to protect you. Girl 1: I know how to stand up. Mother: You know how to stand up? Well, let’s see you do it. Hey, come on, give me a hug. (applause) Now, do any of you want to ask me a question? See, all the people here about this time ask questions. Where are you going? (laughter) I guess–I guess she was finished. (laughter) One Hail Mary ought to do it, you know. (laughter) Child: You know what? Mother: What? Boy 1: My mother gave me her old guitar. Mother: Oh, you decided to come back. What’d you say, honey? Boy 1: My mommy gave me her old, her older guitar. Mother: She did? Boy 1: Yep. Mother: What do you do with it? Boy 1: I play it all the time. Mother: you play a guitar all the time? Girl 1: I have a guitar. Mother: You have a guitar? What do you do with it? We’ve got competition here, everybody. (audience chuckles) Anybody else play any musical instruments? Oh, you do? What do you play? Child: The piano. Mother: You play the piano. How about you? Child: The violin. Mother: The violin! And you? Child: Violin. Mother: Violin? Child: Flute. Mother: Flute? Next time, you bring your instruments and we’ll have a band. (laughter) How about you? Child: Piano. Mother: Piano? And how about you? Child: Guitar. Mother: Guitar, who else? Child: Me. Mother: You play something? Child: Mm-hmm, I play the horn. Mother: You play the horn? Child: And guitar. Mother: And the guitar! You play the horn and guitar. How old are you? How old are you, honey? How old is he? Kids: 5–5 and 1/2. Mother: And a half. You forgot the half. (kids giggle) 5 and 1/2 and you play a horn. You play a horn like this one? Child: No. Mother: No? Child 2: He plays a bugle. Mother: He plays a bugle. I didn’t know there was a bugle when I was his age. And who else plays an instrument? You do? Girl 2: Piano. Girl 3: Piano. Mother: Piano? Oh, we’ll have to do something about that. Now, does anybody have a question, huh? You know all about the saints? You know your own saint, but do you know that you have to be holy, even at your age, huh? What does it mean to be holy? Does anybody know? Who wants to answer that? Child: To love and serve God. Mother: To love and serve God–a very good definition. Does anybody want to add something to that? It’s like obeying your mother and your dad, huh. Bringing out the garbage with joy in your heart? Is that what it is, huh? What else is holiness? Do you know what it is? Yeah, go. Girl: Praying every day. Mother: Praying every day. Girl: And going to Mass and Confession. Mother: And going to Mass and Confession. Not bad. What is it? Child: (indistinguishable) Mother: What is it? Girl: Learning your religion. Mother: Okay, what else? What is holiness? Hmm? It’s being good, hmm, being cheerful, being good, loving Our Lady, loving Our Lord, and knowing… Did you know Jesus is with you all the time, huh? Did you know that? Everybody knows that. Where is Jesus when He’s with you all the time? Child: In your heart. Mother: In your heart, right. He’s right here. Do you talk to Him? What do you say when you talk to Jesus? Child: Thank You for all the blessings You give us, and protect us. Mother: Protect you, okay. Child: And… Mother: Do you pray for other people? Child: Yes. Mother: Oh, really? Who do you pray for–besides your mother and dad? Child: You. Mother: Oh, you pray for me? Wonderful! I like that. I like that. Who do you pray for? Child: Well, people who are in need of medicine and other stuff. Mother: You pray for people that are in need, huh. Who else wants to tell me–what do you pray for? Child: For poor souls in Purgatory. Mother: For the souls in Purgatory. That’s very good. I think they must hear your prayer. What do you pray for? Child: To help Jesus. Mother: to help Jesus? Really? How do you help Jesus? Child: By giving. Mother: Hmm? Child: By giving. Mother: By giving? Well, you’ve got some profound statements here, you know. You help Jesus by giving. Do you believe that you help Jesus by giving? Yeah? What would you give? Who wants to answer that? What would you give? Child: Grace. Mother: Oh, you can’t give grace because grace comes from Jesus. What else can you give? Child: Things you really want. Mother: Ah! Things you really, really want. Child: Love. Mother: Love, yeah. And what else? Child: Yourself. Mother: Yourself. That’s pretty hefty, huh? You give love and you give yourself. And what does it mean to give yourself? Do you know what it means to give yourself, huh? What does it mean? Child: It means totally consecrating yourself to God. Mother: Ah! Totally consecrating yourself to God. These are pretty smart kids up here. And what do you think it is, huh? Do you know what it is to give yourself, to be obedient, to be loving, to be kind and… Do you have brothers and sisters? You? What does it mean? Child: It means you share. Mother: It means what? Child: That you share. Mother: You share. That’s right. It means you share. Do you love your brothers and sisters? Child: Yes. Mother: You do? All the time? Oh, really. Oh, what a bunch of kids here. (audience chuckles) You never get angry or anything? You do? Oh, what do you get angry about, huh? Child: We get angry about hurting people. Mother: You get angry when people are hurt. Oh, do you ever get angry with your brothers and sisters? You do. Oh, what do you get angry about? Hmm, what do you get angry about? You don’t know? You love everybody all the time? You do? There’s not many people like that. Do you love everybody all the time? You do? Pretty special up here, huh. You mean there’s nobody you don’t like? Yeah, you. Careful, now. Girl: Not really. Mother: Not really. Isn’t that wonderful. Yeah, go ahead. Child: The devil. Mother: The devil. Hey, that’s pretty smart. That’s very good. What about… Girl: You might not like what the people do, but it doesn’t mean that you don’t love them. Mother: That’s very good. Do you believe that, that you don’t like what people do but you love them. Hmm? Do you love everybody? You do? I bet you do, too. Yes. Did you want to say something? I think you don’t, huh. Yeah. Child: I do. Mother: You–oh, yeah, you do. What do you want to say? Child: I want to say that my birthday is June 23. Mother: Your birthday is June 23? Child: Yeah. (laughter) Mother: Is there–are you telling us this for last year or next year or this year? Child: I’m 3 years old. Mother: How old are you? You were 2? 3? And you were 3 on June 23? Did you have a birthday party? Was it nice? Are you going to blow the horn? (laughter) I guess–aren’t you going to blow the horn for your birthday? Child: I had some presents at my birthday party. Mother: I want you to know there is hope for the Church, and there is hope for the Church because we have wonderful children like this. All of these children are home-schooled, and you have to say a lot for home school. And other schools that are wonderful. But these children are being brought up to know God and to love Him and serve Him, and to have a real relationship with the communion of saints. And they know–they know their saints and they love their saints, and they know what it means to be holy and they know what it means to be good. And so what I just wanted to say is that I wanted to thank you all for coming this evening. Did you enjoy yourselves? Huh? You weren’t even afraid, were you? Hmm? No. Would you like to say a Hail Mary for everybody in the audience? Huh? How about you? You want to join us, huh? Well, why don’t you start and everybody will chime in. Want to start? Go ahead. Child: “Hail Mary…” Mother and kids: “Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with Thee. “Blessed art Thou among women and blessed is the fruit of Thy womb, Jesus. “Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners now and at the hour of our death. Amen.” Mother: You know, in the latter days, Gabriel is going to blow that horn. (audience laughs) And I guess I’ll have to wait until that day. Are you going to blow it for me? Come on, give it a crack. Well, everybody, I can’t wait all night, and so we’ll be back in just a minute. (applause) [music] [music] (applause) Mother: Well, St. Gabriel just passed by and she’s still not blowing that horn. (chuckles) We have a call. Hello. Caller 1 (female): Hello, Mother Angelica. Can you hear me? Mother: Yes, I can. And where are you from? Caller: I’m Carol Brown, your dear friend from Chicago. Now, that name might not ring a bell since you get so many calls, but you wrote me not too long ago. I’m the one who was baptized in 1993, and I’ll tell you the reason I’m calling tonight. Today is the Feast of All Saints, Mother Angelica, and I’m all choked up because I cannot find the right words to tell you how you have changed my life. Mother: Praise God! Caller 1: If you look out in the audience tonight and you see a bunch of pretty sisters, those are the Felician Sisters from Chicago and Manitowoc, and I am a lay associate member of their community. In fact, I’m looking at them right now. I met them last week and I want you to know that my ministry is to these sisters and to the aged and infirm and elderly sisters here in Chicago, which is a ministry which is much overlooked and I spend a lot of my free time–in fact most of my free time–with them. I’m looking at them right now. And I can’t tell you how I wish I could be part of this trip and with them right now. Mother: Well you are. Right now you are part of them and with them on this trip. And I thank you for your call. We have another call. Hello. Caller 2 (female): Hello? Mother: Hello. Caller 2: Hi. Mother: Where are you from? Caller 2: I’m from Michigan. Mother: And what is your question? Caller 2: We’re supposed to ask a question? (laughter) No, I was calling for all the parents of the little children. I thought they were so sweet and adorable. And I’m a teenager and I just thought it so sweet I almost started crying. I’m like, “Oh, my gosh, look at all those cute little kids,” and I just thought it was so cute and I just want to compliment the parents for raising their kids like that and I just thought it was so great because I’m part of a Catholic family and I love my family and I just thought it was so great…. Mother: Well, we did too. I didn’t, I’ve never talked to children before so I was a little hesitant because… But you know, the Lord gave His grace. And they’re funny. Kids are funny. And I think if they were on a couple more times, they’d be more relaxed and they’d tell us things their parents wish they hadn’t said. (audience laughs) So anyway–but this is really how Catholics should respond to Halloween. There’s such an emphasis on the wrong things. And we need to keep religion in all our feast days. And you know Christmas is coming along and it’s anything but a Christ-day. It’s not a Jesus day. It’s a holi-day–and not a holy day sometimes in our heart. These children remind us that even at that age you can teach them about God and you can have fun doing it. And that’s why I wanted to bring them on, or the sisters did and I went along with it with a little trepidation. But then I think they did great. And I feel that it’s a great example. We have pagan influence in every holiday. Easter is–you see little bunnies running around, you know. Well, what’s a bunny got to do with Easter? And so you got a little eggs, everybody’s throwing hard boiled eggs. And oh, how you can throw a hard boiled egg, I don’t know. (audience chuckles) And it represents what? See, spring, new life–no. We use pagan methods for holidays and we have forgotten. And these children will know a lot about Easter by the time that day comes along and I think they could tell us a lot. And maybe we need to look at our children and ask them some questions. And we’ll be surprised. We’ll be very surprised, not only at what they really know, but we’ll know also, if you looked at these children, you’d know that their minds are open, wide open to God, to the Trinity, to love, to the saints, to angels, to Our Lady. They’re wide open. Don’t fill their minds with sex education. That’s not where it should be. We have another call. Hello. Caller 3 (female): Hello, Mother. Mother: And where are you from? Caller 3: I’m Patricia from New Jersey. Mother: And what is your question? Caller 3: I was wondering, when did the communion of saints first become Church doctrine and when was it mentioned and first practiced in the early years of the Church? Mother: The communion of saints has been with us from day 1. The first martyr, Stephen and John, John the apostle, from that day on they began to take relics. They would soak their handkerchiefs in the blood of the martyrs. They would take the martyrs and keep their clothing. In fact, even St. Paul, he had a hard time keeping handkerchiefs because everybody saw him wipe his nose, they took his handkerchief. (audience chuckles) And… (Mother chuckles) Sounds kind of gross, doesn’t it? But really and truly they wanted something of the saint because they knew they were in Heaven, they knew they were martyrs, and for the 1st 300 years of the Church, most Christians became martyrs. Every pope and most bishops became martyrs. And they know that those people were sensitive even after they died. They were in Heaven and there was a communion between the people on earth and the people who were martyred. That’s why the catacombs, they would keep the whole body of a saint and you would go through the catacombs and you would find one saint after another martyred under Diocletian, martyred under Nero, martyred under Caligula. And so from then on we always knew that there was a communion between us, that they weren’t dead and gone, out of mind, out of sight. And that is the Church Triumphant. Tomorrow we celebrate the feast of the Church Suffering, the souls in Purgatory. And we living on earth are the Church Militant. You say, “Well, why militant?” Militant because we fight. We fight to survive. We fight to survive in a pagan world. We fight to define our faith, to defend our faith. This is a great time to be alive. You can’t be a Catholic and just “be” one, you know. You’ve got to define and defend your faith. And these children are learning that. They’re learning it now. And so we are constantly in touch, every day, with the Church Militant, you and I–with the Church Suffering, which we celebrate tomorrow with three Masses and all of the prayers that we can say for those poor souls–and the Church Triumphant, the Church in Heaven. We have another call. Hello. Caller 4 (female): Hello, Mother. Mother: And what is your question? Caller 4: My question is, Mother, if Halloween is seen as such an evil thing, why do some Catholics celebrate it? Mother: Ignorance, I suppose. I could call it something else, but I won’t. I think they have kind of bought the world. And they put on the most atrocious, hideous costumes. Have you noticed in the stores now there’s a lot of terrible faces, demon faces and demon masks, and they know whose feast it is. The saints, that is their one day, feast, a year. And they do terrible things. Our sisters stayed in the chapel all night, two at a time, to make reparation for all the horrible, horrible things that went on in every city in the whole world last night because of the awesome power of satan. And that’s why on the eve of All Saints we shouldn’t have our children going around looking like vampires and demons, you see. You say, “Why do Catholics do that?” I have a hard time with why Catholics do a lot of things–choose abortion, birth control, drink, smoke to excess. Just a lot of things, you see. And it only tells me at some point in their life they have not learned how to be a Catholic, how to live–live your Catholicity. We have another call. Hello. Caller 5 (male): Hi, Mother Angelica. Mother: Hi, where are you from? Caller 5: Chicago, Illinois. Mother: And what is your question? Caller 5: We’re calling to thank you for this blessed program tonight. Mother: (Chuckles) I’m glad you enjoyed it. Caller 5: We think it is so great and we would like to send our blessings out to all the children that were in it and… Mother: Thank you. Caller 5: And that they never lose what they had tonight. Mother: Well, I hope they don’t. And I hope all the children watching remember that even the smallest, 3 years old, knew how to pray and knew God, knew Jesus. And the one boy said he came just because he loves Jesus. It’s a marvelous little evening. I think I was a little awkward but they weren’t. They were very much at home and they knew what they were going to do and what they were going to say. We have another call. Hello. Caller 6 (female): Sister? Mother: Hi. Where are you from? Caller 6: Vicksburg, Mississippi. Mother: And what is your question? Caller 6: Well, 1 thing I wanted to tell you. Last night we had some trick-or-treaters come to our home that were from the Catholic school here and they were collecting canned goods for the homeless. Mother: Oh, that’s wonderful. Caller 6: So that some good was made out of Halloween. Mother: Oh, yeah, that’s great. Caller 6: And I’ve got a little 3-year-old that would like to say something to you and say a prayer. Mother: Okay! Caller 6: Just a moment. Mother: Hi, sweetheart. Child on phone: Hi. Mother: And what do you want to say? Child on phone: I love you. Mother: I love you? Well, I love you too… Child on phone: “Our Father, Who art in Heaven, hallowed be Thy name. “Thy will be done on earth and Heaven. “Give this bread, our daily bread. “Give those who trespass against us. “Lead not into matation but deliver us from evil. “God the Kingdom and the power and the glory forever. Amen.” (laughter and applause) Child on phone: I love you. Thank you. Mother: Well. I think that was a beautiful prayer. Child on phone: God bless you. Mother: You’re welcome. And I love you too. We want to thank all the parents here this evening who have taught their children these wonderful, wonderful festivities and feast days and made a pagan feast day into something beautiful and something holy and something good. And you can do the same. You know, our holy father said that teaching the children really begins at home. And in many instances, I’m beginning to believe it begins and ends at home because many times you don’t get what you should be getting. And so what I want to say tonight is, uphold your faith. And have these little feast days. If you can’t have them at your parish, have them in your families. Have them in your neighborhood. I think it’s absolutely phenomenal that we who live in a kind of a pagan world can raise it up–raise it up–by having the children do these kind of things. And letting the children see that this is a feast day. This day is special. And now you can start preparing for Thanksgiving. Thanksgiving is an American feast, but you know, it’s a very wonderful feast day. It would be nice if on Thanksgiving morning you made little things that the kids could pick out of a bowl and say, “What are you grateful for?” “I’m grateful for life. “I’m grateful for my mother and my father. “I’m grateful that I know Jesus.” And then you can take every event in the year, whether it’s a secular feast or a Church feast. And all these wonderful feast days that have kind of been shelved, we used to call them holy days of obligation, you can make it a holy day in your house. Give the kids something special. Have a special meal. Say special prayers. Just say, “Today we’re going on an outing.” “Why?” “Because it’s a feast day.” You need these feast days. You’ve got to live your religion like these children do. I thought the mothers had to be phenomenal because they’re the ones that had to make all these things. And they didn’t know they were going to be on television. We called them about 3 o’clock this afternoon. (audience chuckles) And they had to do some– they really had to move. And I think–you know what I think–all the men thought of it and all the women made the stuff. (audience laughs) Is that what happened? Yes? Yeah, we got Uncle Robert here, he’s shaking his head. You know, that’s just about how it happened. But you know, if religion isn’t a part of our daily life… Sunday, for example. How special is Sunday in your family as a Catholic? See, you can make Sunday so beautiful for your family that they look forward to Sunday. And we have to do these things. We just have to do them. So as Thanksgiving comes along and Christmas… Oh, December 8, you know, when we get the Immaculate Conception, explain it to them, and let’s have a big feast day, something very special on that day. Why? Because it’s a special day for the Mother of God. And Christmas ought to be the greatest of the year next to Easter. So what I would like to do is to encourage you to incorporate prayer in your daily life as a family. If you don’t have time to say the Rosary… And tell the children why you’re praying. We’re praying for the world. We’re praying for the Church. We’re praying for more faith, more hope. We’re praying for the sick today. Today we pray for all the children that are sick. We pray for all the elderly that are so alone. See, I was going to talk about loneliness today, this evening but this came along and I thought this was better, so we’ll kind of tackle that next week. And remember the love of Jesus and tell these children about Jesus. Tell them how much Jesus loves them. And that little boy said, “I’m dressed like St. Michael just because I love Jesus.” Oh, what a sentence, huh. How do you dress because you love Jesus? Do you dress because you love Jesus? The way some of you dress, I don’t think you love anything or anybody. I don’t even think you love yourself. I wouldn’t be seen dead with some of the stuff you people wear. (audience chuckles) I mean, It’s just horrible. It’s suggestive. We do have to depict our particular religion. My religion, my Catholicity has to be spoken loud and clear by how you act, how you talk, how you live, and how much you love. Well, I’ve had a great time. I don’t know about you. Have you had a great time? (applause) Come on, get out here. Yaay! Here we go. Ha-ha! Come over here. We’re going to have a family hug. How about that, huh! (chuckles) Come on, get up there. Here we go. Ah, the horn. Yaay! (applause) You going to blow it? Give it a blow. Okay. (horn goes blaaat) (laughter and applause) This thing doesn’t blow! (laughter) (horn goes blaaat) I bet you knew that. Did you know that? Huh? Come over here. Come over here. Well, I’ve had a great time. Have you had a great time, huh? Well, you just say goodbye to everybody… (applause) [music]

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