David Saint-Jacques in Space: Interview | CBC Kids News

David Saint-Jacques in Space: Interview | CBC Kids News


CBC Kids News,this is
Mission Control, Houston
.Please call Station
for a voice check.
I said “Station, this is
Saara, how do you hear me?” Right out of a movie! ♪ [theme]Station, this is Houston.Are you ready
for the event?
[static] Houston, this is Station.
I am ready. ♪ ♪ Hey Saara, I have
you loud and clear. When I spoke to you
before you left… [whirrs, beep] So what has been
the most exciting aspect
of your training… ..you said that one
of the great things about space training
is that everyone gets along, regardless of their
country’s conflicts on Earth [whirrs, beep] Space is one of those few things
that humans do well together. Has this followed through
to your space expedition? What is it like out there with
the people you’re working with? Absolutely, it has. You can see behind me they–
the banner– all of flags of countries that
contributed to the International Space Station
and everyday onboard,we are reminded that we are
an example that everyday,
we work together,
everyday, we prove
that when countries decide
to put aside their differences,
which exist and are true,
but when we put aside
our differences and focus
on what we have in common, we can accomplish
amazing things. And we are very proud
here, astronauts, to be demonstrating
that everyday. What can we learn
and how can we implement what you’ve learned in space about
getting along together on Earth? I think the most
important is to recognize that there are differences,
there will be differences and then respect each other
for our differences, but then focus on what we have
in common, which is huge.And one thing you get obvious
when you look at the Earth,
seen from space, is that
it’s just one big spacecraft
for all of humanity
and we’re all in the same boat,
if you want, literally, the
same space boat, Mother Earth.
And so, I think, it’s
just a matter of focus.
If you focus
on the differences,
of course, they’re there,
and they can become,
you know, overwhelming.But, if you focus
on what we have in common
that’s when you open the door
to collaboration and getting further and maybe one day
managing to work together and amazing things
we can achieve when we put our
strength together. You’ve been in space
for six months now. Are you nervous about coming
back to Earth for your re-entry? Ah, well, you know, of course,
I’ve gotten used to this place. So, any change is a source
of stress in a way. It took me a while to get
used to this place here,learned to fly, initially,
it was actually, not so easy
. Now I’m pretty
agile, moving around, I can be upside down,
It doesn’t bother me. I can fly,
I can bounce off the walls,and you know,
I never lose my way.
But, it wasn’t like
that in the beginning.So this feels like home now
and I know that coming back
to Earth, I will have to learn
again to live with gravity.
I learn again to walk,
and learn to live again with many many
people around me. This will be different,
but I have no fear that I can, I can adapt.
That’s the beautiful thing of human nature,
that we can adapt. Saara:What is your message
to us and to young Canadians
or young kids
all around the world?
Life is a series
of experiences and that, you know, what you do
with them is up to you.How you kind of,
process them and the lessons
you learned from them.But, the journey is as
important, if not more important
than the destination.And I would tell
young people, you know,
it’s important to find
the dream that’s in your soul. I find that sometimes, it’s a
very very little voice and we can be afraid of our
dream, if it’s huge and crazy. Me, I had this
ridiculous dream, I wanted to
understand everything. That’s impossible.
I’ll never be able to do that.But that led me to go
from one degree to the next
and explore and learn languages
and different cultures.
I’ll probably never reach
my dream of understanding everything, of course,
but I’ll try, and that dream, which is more of a direction
than a destination, is what
keeps us moving. And if you don’t have a dream
then someone else will tell you what to do and that’s just,
you know, that’s just too bad.It’s better
if you decide yourself,
which way you go in the morning,
when you wake up,
so find your dream
and cherish it.
It is your most
important treasure.
All right.
Bye-bye Saara. So that was my interview
with David Saint-Jacques at the International
Space Station. I’m so grateful
for this opportunity because base travel
is such a hot topic. We want to know more
about the universe around us. Maybe one day
you’ll be in space. For cbckidsnews.ca,
I’m Saara Chaudry. ♪ ♪

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